How did the Poland-Belarus dispute start? What is its impact in Europe?

World

The border between Belarus and Poland has been tense recently. A large number of immigrants and refugees have gathered here since Monday. They want to cross the border into Poland. It is estimated that thousands of people have gathered in the border areas of the two countries. However, these immigrants and refugees who want to leave Belarus are not being allowed to enter Poland.

 

The barbed wire in the border area and the large number of security forces deployed there have become an obstacle for them. Temperatures are dropping in this border area. People lack medicine and essential supplies. So they are in a lot of trouble. Where did this problem start? To know this, we need to know what is happening now.

So, what’s going on?

About 3,000 to 4,000 refugees are now in the border area. Among those gathered here are conflict victims from Afghanistan to the Gulf states. They have been living in ‘No Man’s Land’ on the border between the two countries since they were not allowed to enter Poland.

Human rights groups and international organizations are raising questions about the rights of these immigrants. They point to the suffering they have experienced as winter approaches and the deaths of some people. But aid agencies, lawyers and journalists are not allowed on either side of the border.

How did the crisis start?

The crisis began earlier this year. Belarussian President Alexander Lukashenko has also reacted sharply to EU sanctions on his country. Last May, a passenger jet was forcibly landed in Belarus, and Roman Protasevich, a journalist critical of the government, was arrested.

A few months before the incident, the EU and the United States imposed various sanctions on Belarus. He expressed support for Belarus’s opposition. He accused President Lukashenko of rigging the August 2020 election and cracking down on the opposition. The 67-year-old was elected for a sixth term despite fierce street protests.

Lukashenko also reacted sharply to the EU and US sanctions. He also announced that Belarus would not allow undocumented migrants and immigrants to enter EU countries.

He asserted that his confession had been obtained through torture, and that his confession had been obtained through torture. He also said that Belarus needed money to stop the flow of refugees and that the EU should take care of that. Since then, the number of refugees passing through Belarus has been increasing in countries bordering Belarus, including Lithuania, Latvia and Poland.

What does the EU say?
The European Union (EU) has accused Belarus of inciting migrants. The European Union (EU) has described the move as a “hybrid attack” because it has been urged to move west. The European Union (EU) has accused Belarus of pursuing such a move in response to the blockade.

Lukashenko has denied the allegations. He accused the EU of violating human rights by violating international rules on safe movement of people and asylum. Recently, there have been reports of undocumented immigrants being returned to Belarus by Polish military guards.

Does Russia have a role to play?
Poland has accused Russian President Vladimir Putin of plotting the crisis. But Russia has denied the allegations. Russia has accused Poland and other EU member states of trying to seduce Belarus.

Russia views Belarus as a “protection zone” against the EU and NATO alliance. Russia also sent paramilitary troops to Belarus for a military exercise on Friday. He has been providing support and assistance to Lukashenko’s government. Earlier this year, the Russian military patrolled Belarus for two days with two nuclear-powered armored vehicles.

What can happen now
It is unclear. But the tension seems to be deepening. Following the border dispute, the EU is considering whether to impose further sanctions on Belarus. This time, the EU could also target Belarusian airlines and impose sanctions. Belarus has not acknowledged the crisis. Mr Lukashenko’s government has warned that it will not do anything to end the crisis unless the West imposes sanctions on its government.

Lukashenko also threatened to retaliate if the EU imposed further sanctions. Belarus has threatened to cut off gas supplies from Russia to Europe via a pipeline. However, Russia wants to keep the issue of gas out of the ongoing crisis. Russia has said it is committed to fulfilling its gas supply agreement.

Last week, the price of gas in the European market is at an all-time high. The situation will become very sensitive if supply is disrupted again.

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